7 Core Pillars

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Faculty Development

The aim of India’s higher education system is attaining sustainable development and achieving higher growth rates which could be enabled through creation, transmission and dissemination of knowledge. Higher education at all levels in the country is witnessing a consistent growth pattern marked by the setting up of new institutions and the improvement of the existing ones. Demand for qualified teachers and faculty members over the next few years would be substantial and will become extremely critical for states to expand the current institutional capacities, not only of infrastructure but also of qualified and trained faculty members.

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Skill Development

Skill Development and Entrepreneurship development efforts across the country have been highly fragmented so far. Though India enjoys the demographic advantage of having the youngest workforce with an average age of 29 years in comparison with the advanced economies, as opposed to the developed countries, where the percentage of skilled workforce is between 60% and 90% of the total workforce, India records a low 5% of workforce (20-24 years) with formal employability skills.

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Entrepreneurship Development

Entrepreneurs play an important role in the economic development of a country. Successful entrepreneurs innovate, bring new products and concepts to the market, improve market efficiency, build wealth, create jobs, and enhance economic growth. Entrepreneurs convert ideas into economic opportunities through innovations which are considered to be major source of competitiveness in an increasingly globalizing world economy.

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Youth Empowerment

By 2020, India’s population is expected to become the world’s youngest; more than 500 million Indian citizens will be under 25 years of age and more than two thirds of the population will be eligible to work. This means that a growing number of India’s youth need the right educational infrastructure to develop skills and adequate opportunities to get employed or become entrepreneurs.

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Research & Publications

Four decades ago, significant discoveries were numerous, but most occurred in the well-established economies of Europe and North America. In 1973, about two-thirds of the nearly 400,000 research publications had an author in one of the G7 countries.

Today, this has changed dramatically. Four times as many documents - more than 1.75 million journal publications - are being indexed, and barely half will have a G7 author. A significant part of the change is attributable to rapid research growth in five countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Korea.

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Digital Empowerment

In a country with more than 6,50,000 villages, where more than half of its population live in rural areas and villages. Most are remote and too isolated to benefit from the country’s impressive economic progress. Yet there’s a growing desire among people in rural India to be part of the modern Digital India. But the last-mile delivery has always been a challenge for India due to low technology literacy among the rural citizens.

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Industry-Institute Interaction

With the advent of globalization and opening up of Indian economy to outside world, competition among industries has become stiff. To solve their engineering problems they look up now to engineering institutions. Similarly, there is an urgent need to prepare engineering students for jobs in multinational companies, by exposing them to newer technologies and engineering methodologies.

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